Roasting Levels

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Cinnamon (380º F)

A very light brown roast just before 1st crack. Toasted grain flavors and sharp acidic tones are combined in a tea-like body.

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Full City (435º F)

A medium-to-dark brown roast with slight surface oil. Acidic brightness is starting to mute and bittersweet flavors are emerging.

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New England
(400º F)

A light brown roast traditional in the Northeastern U.S. Acidic brightness dominates without tasting grainy.

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Vienna (445º F)

A dark brown roast with light surface oil. Caramel and bittersweet flavors are prominent with some hints of smoke.

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American (410º F)

A medium light brown roast most common of U.S. coffees. Acidic brightness and varietal sweetness are balanced in a medium body.

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French (455º F)

A very dark brown roast shiny with oil. Burnt undertones and smoky flavors are in balance with subtle varietal sweetness.

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City (425º F)

A medium roast with a full body and strong aromatics. Good for tasting the varietal character of the coffee.

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Italian (465º F)

A nearly black roast with significant surface oil. Burnt/smoky tones, no acidity and light body replace varietal character.